DIRT QUAKE COMING TO AMERICA! | SIDEBURN & SEE SEE UNITE TO THROW DIRT IN ‘YER EYE!

Sideburn and See See Motorcycles have joined forces to bring Dirt Quake to the USA! Flat track racing that ain’t pretty or professional, but it sure is a whole helluva lotta fun! And that’s the point!

The original Dirt Quake, back in 2012, was Sideburn magazine’s idea to get novices racing their motorcycles that don’t fit into normal motorcycle sport, and at minimum cost. For 2014 Sideburn has partnered with See See Motorcycles of Portland, OR to take Dirt Quake to a Grand National Championship track in the Pacific Northwest.

Dirt Quake USA is a two-day event with the opportunity to watch the pros and top amateurs race pure flat track bikes on Saturday, then race, or point at complete novices competing on totally unfit-for-purpose bikes, in the special Dirt Quake classes on Sunday. Saturday night is a camp out with live music. Sunday is purely for road bikes and the emphasis is on fun and enjoying the experience, not red mist and race bikes. It’s also a show for spectators of all ages and will include dangerous stunts, live music– and the unforgettable spectacle of watching the exceptionally unprepared try to race the wilfully inappropriate!

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OLD NAVY

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U.S. Navy recruiting poster– circa 1917.  She’s sporting standard naval issue enlisted dress blues– or “crackerjacks” as they were commonly called in reference to the sailor boy on the popular Cracker Jack box.

Women have served as an integral and invaluable part of the U.S. Navy since the establishment of the Nurse Corps in 1908.  Nine years later, the Navy authorized the enlistment of women as “Yeomanettes.” In 1948, the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act was signed, making it possible for women to officially enter the U.S. Navy in regular or reserve status.

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It’s commonly thought that the “bell bottom” trouser was introduced in 1817 to permit men to roll them above the knee when washing down the decks– and to make it easier to remove them in a hurry when forced to abandon ship or when washed overboard.  Old Navy folklore has suggested that they may have also been used as a life preserver– by knotting the legs at the opening and filling them with air.

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VINTAGE LEVI’S 501 JEANS | AN AMERICAN FASHION ICON

1950s Levi's Vintage 501 - front. Courtesy of Warehouse website

 

1950s Levi’s Vintage 501 – front. Check the leg twist you’d get with old, un-sanforized denim.

1950s Levi's Vintage 501, back- Courtesy of Warehouse website.

Back view of a vintage Levi’s 501 jean.

Why do I love vintage Levi 501 jeans you ask?  Let me count the ways-

  • The capital “E’ on the red tab, introduced in 1936 and produced up until 1971.
  • The brown leather patch- changed to “leather-like” cardstock in the mid-late 1950s.
  • The red selvedge 10 oz denim woven by Cone Mills, North Carolina on 29″ wide looms.  I wish it were a little denser- but I’m not complainin’.
  • The incredible leg-twist that you get on a pair of vintage non-sanforized 501 jeans.
  • The great tracks produced by the selvedge outseams from wear and bruising of the denim.
  • The Arcuate stitching or “double arcs” on the back pockets- one of the oldest apparel trademarks still in use today.  During WWII it was actually painted on to due to government rationing.
  • The very narrow hem at the bottom leg opening, and all the great bunching and bruising from shrinkage and wear.

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