New York Haberdashery Show

Robert Redd Haberdashery II

I had a blast “getting my Redd on” with friends at the Warwick Hotel today.  The Haberdashery Show starts Saturday in NYC, so all of us Redd extended family members” put in a fun day of folding shirts, dressing rigs and pinning boards to get ready for the event.  It’s personally rewarding to be a part of something special like Robert Redd.  I regret forgetting my camera, but Carol saved the day and snapped a few pics while we were setting up.  The photo above was taken in the afternoon before we were completely done, but you’ll get the idea.

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Known for their signature knit shirts in a breadth of color- Robert Redd  has now expanded their product range to include sportshirts, sweaters and accessories that are sure to please diehard followers along with adding some new.  Robert Redd is based in Charlottesville, VA and run by a couple of great guys- owner Robert Matheson and Eric Jones.  It’s a brand that believes in telling their story through beautiful product more than selling you their mark- there are no logos on Robert Redd shirts.  I know I’ve said this before, but they do a great knit shirt with a self-collar and open sleeve- The Charles.  

Robert Redd is definitely a brand  whose time has come– so you have my permission to get a Redd on for the ladies.

Link to Robert Redd “Charles” shirt

The Schott Perfecto- The Original Wild One.

 

 

The Schott Perfecto 618

My last post on Evel Kneivel really got me thinking about motorcycles and their impact on American fashion and culture.  There is no better example than the Schott Perfecto 618.  First introduced in 1928– and still made here in the U.S.A.–it is the original motorcycle jacket and still considered the gold standard to which all others are compared.  The now classic double riders zip-front design was prized by bikers not just for it’s tough looks- when fully zipped it kept the wind and chill out.  

 

The Wild One-  Marlon Brando & company 1953.

Marlon Brando as Johnny, leader of the Black Rebel Motorcycle Club in The Wild One.

 

The Perfecto took on cult status thanks to 1953’s The Wild One starring Marlon Brando.  It soon became a symbol of rebellion and was widely banned from schools during the 1950s.  The vintage Perfectos (and a lot of the motorcycle jackets back then) were made of thick horsehide– durable as all hell, but they took some breaking in.  If you’re lucky enough to find a vintage Perfecto, snatch it up- they are rare and highly coveted.  

 

Link to Schott Perfecto

 

 

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