PEOPLE ALWAYS CALLED ME BLONDIE | AT SOME POINT I BECAME DIRTY HARRY

“Hi, it’s Deb.  You know, when I woke up this morning I had a realization about myself.  I was always Blondie.  People always called me Blondie, ever since I was a little kid. What I realized is that at some point I became Dirty Harry.  I couldn’t be Blondie anymore, so I became Dirty Harry.”

–Debbie Harry

Debbie Harry of Blondie, Coney Island, NY, 1977 — Image © Bob Gruen

“It was in the early ’70s and I was trying to get across town at two or three o’clock in the morning.  This little car kept coming around and offering me a ride.  I kept saying ‘No’ but finally I took the ride because I couldn’t get a cab.”  

“I got in the car and the windows were are rolled up, except for a tiny crack.  This driver had an incredibly bad smell to him. I looked down and there were no door handles.  The inside of the car was stripped. The hairs on the back of my neck just stood up.”  

“I wiggled my arm out of the window and pulled the door handle from the outside.  I don’t know how I did it, but I got out. He tried to stop me by spinning the car but it sort of helped me fling myself out.”

” Afterwards I saw him on the news–  Ted Bundy.”

–Debbie Harry

Debbie Harry, NYC, 1976 —  Image © Bob Gruen

1978 — Debbie Harry of Blondie — Image by © Martyn Goddard/Corbis

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20TH CENTURY AVANT-GARDE ICON | TSY STYLE HALL OF FAME JEAN COCTEAU

“An artist cannot speak about his art any more than a plant can discuss horticulture.”

–Jean Cocteau

Jean Cocteau.  Quite possibly the most important art icon of the 20th century, who could seemingly do it all, and with great style– painter, poet, playwright, novelist, actor, film-maker, the list goes on and on. But he was first and foremost a poet at heart– and a truly incredible one at that.

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Stunning photo of Jean Cocteau by Irving Penn.  Damn, the man had style.  Borrowing a page out of The Duke of Windsor’s book– perfectly pairing classic menswear patterns with elegance and ease. “Penn made this portrait of Jean Cocteau during a 1948 trip to Paris for Vogue.  Each thread of Cocteau’s tie, vest, and suit is etched in light and shadow; the patterns and the texture pop out in vivid, tactile detail.  The drape of his coat over an extended arm adds drama and balance to the composition. Cocteau is dressed in the sartorial attire of a dandy, which, by all accounts, he was.  There is an air of flamboyance about him, until you look at his face.  His dead-serious expression registers the fierce intelligence of a keen observer, as if he is taking our measure while deigning to allow us to take his.” –Philip Gefter via

August 1955, France– Picasso with Jean Cocteau at a Bullfight –Image by © Vittoriano Rastelli/Corbis Pablo Picasso and Jean Cocteau knew one another for nearly fifty years. They met in 1915 following Picasso’s departure from martre, where Cocteau’s friend, the poet Max Jacob, had shared an atelier with the painter– one using the only bed by day, and other by night. Picasso made an immediate and lasting impression on Cocteau, who considered him as one of his three masters. via

Jean Cocteau sketching model Elizabeth Gibbons in a Chanel dress in his hotel bedroom (Castille in the Rue Cambon), surrounded by posters of his latest theatrical productions, photos of friends, medicine bottles, books, stage sets and pencils, 1937.  –photo by Roger Schall via

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DAVID HOCKNEY | STYLE– TAKE WHAT YOU WANT, AND DON’T LET IT TRAP YOU

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“The moment you cheat for the sake of beauty– you know you’re an artist.”

–David Hockney

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(Lt.) Artist David Hockney — image King Collection/Retna LTD (Rt.) Art Card by Simon Fieldhouse

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“Style is something you can use, and you can be like a magpie,  just taking what you want.  The idea of the rigid style seemed to me then something you needn’t concern yourself with, it would trap you.”

–David Hockney

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David Hockney’s philosophy on art appears to be perfectly manifesting itself in his personal style above. In his younger days, there was this cool juxtaposition between the artsy-fartsy, graphic form of the harsh, black-framed glasses and Warhol-ian mop-top, mixed with his rumpled, old school ease from the neck down–  prepster rugby shirt, chinos and battered tennis shoes.  Style– Just take what you want, don’t let it trap you.

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Circa 1965 — Visual artist David Hockney at an art opening. — Image by © Bob Adelman/Corbis.  I dig the clean, graphic shock of red & yellow against the black t-shirt and eyeglasses.  Simple, yet striking.

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“Any artist will tell you he’s really only interested in the stuff he’s doing now. He will, always. It’s true– and it should be like that.”

–David Hockney

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Circa 1980s– Artist David Hockney — Images by © Martyn Goddard/Corbis

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“Art has to move you and design does not– unless it’s a good design for a bus.”

–David Hockney

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VINTAGE ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER | PUMPING IRON ON THE SILVER SCREEN

Arnold Schwarzenegger with female friend in his prime, 1970s.

Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime with a wig-wearin’ female friend Joyce Gibson (AKA Alexis Love in the porn world), circa 1970s.

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Say what you will about Arnold– he’s always spoken his mind, whether people can handle it or not. Remember the 1977 interview with Oui magazine? I can’t print it here, man. Crazy, crazy stuff. The guy’s an animal. Schwarzenegger learned early on that if you’re beautiful, charismatic and powerful– you can say or do just about anything, with a big cheesy smile on your face. All that aside, he’s an icon who put bodybuilding on mainstream America’s map. Yes, there were definitely others before him– but Arnold took it beyond just sport & physical fitness. He made it sexy and entertaining like no one else.

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Arnold Schwarzenegger  --by Andy Warhol

Arnold Schwarzenegger, 1977 –by Andy Warhol

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Pumping Iron is an absolute pop culture classic (video after the jump).  You get to witness the world of bodybuilding arguably at it’s peak– with all the twisted and intense– competitiveness, silliness and drama that sums up our human nature.  At times these brutes are fierce, and other times they’re like primping girls at a beauty pageant vainly craving recognition–  only much bigger.  And don’t forget, this is a sport that comes with a lot of pain & sacrifice.  You have to credit them for the years of dedication and intense training– whether it’s your thing or not.

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