TRUE WIMBLEDON LEGEND | THE ENIGMATIC BJORN “ICE” BORG

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My heart wanted Andy Roddick to win Wimbledon so bad– but my head knew that Roger Federer would pull it out– through cool, consistent, calculated play.  The better player definitely won, even though Federer’s acknowledgement of Roddick’e impressive play after the trophy ceremony felt a little snide and condescending.  I think the guy just can’t help it– he loves himself.  See him playing with his pretty hair nonstop?  Please.  And his cute little comment to Pete Sampras, who he trumped with a record 15 Grand Slam singles titles– “Thanks for coming out” seemed more than a little ungracious.  Federer has a great game, but he’s not my cup of tea.  For me, it doesn’t get any better than back in the wooden racket days of Jimmy Connors, John McEnroe, and the first rockstar of tennis– Bjorn Borg.

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Bjorn Borg

Bjorn Borg relishing his fifth straight Wimbledon singles victory in 1980.

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Bjorn Borg won an unprecedented five consecutive Wimbledon titles– from 1976-1980.  The 1980 Wimbledon final between Borg and McEnroe is easily considered the best and most memorable matchup of all time.  McEnroe seemed to have victory in hand early on, but the Swede proved once again to have more stamina and tenacity– breaking McEnroe down for the win.  Borg was widely considered nearly invincible at the time– his physical conditioning was legendary.

During his reign he also claimed six French Open titles, and even won Wimbledon and the French Open in the same year three times— the only player ever to do so more than once.  Winning both in the same year was even more remarkable because in those days there was only a week of preparation for the grass between the two events.  All these accomplishments came during a time when men’s tennis was brimming with truly great champions– the competition was crushing.

Bjorn Borg was also a bit of an enigma, which added to his charm and appeal.  He suddenly and surprisingly retired at the age of 25, with many great tennis playing years still ahead, after McEnroe handed him a painful defeat at the Wimbledon finals in 1981.  Imagine if Borg he had continued to play? He may very well have become tennis’ greatest champion of all time.

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Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe

In 1980, Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe put on one of the greatest matches Wimbledon has ever seen.

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NEIL YOUNG AND THE DAMAGE DONE | The Godfather of Grunge’s Early Years

December 1969, San Diego, California, USA --- Neil Young plays his vintage Gretsch White Falcon during a sound check at Balboa Stadium just before a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young concert. --- Image by © Henry Diltz

December 1969, San Diego-- Neil Young plays his Gretsch White Falcon during a sound check at Balboa Stadium before a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young concert. -- Image by © Henry Diltz

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Over his long and storied career, Neil Young has explored and influenced a wide range of musical styles– but it’s his early days that I love the most.  There’s an ache and an angst in Young’s voice that resonates, and his guitar playing feels bare, matter of fact, and honest.  Neil Young is often referred to as “The Godfather of Grunge” for the impact and influence he had on the grunge scene– Eddie Vedder and Kurt Cobain in particular.  Cobain even went as far to quote Neil Young in his suicide note– using the line “It’s better to burn out, than to fade away” from Young’s song “My My, Hey Hey (Out of the Blue)”.

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“IVY LEAGUE TODAY” 1975 | VINTAGE RALPH LAUREN POLO

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Heavy Tweed Jacket has one of the most amazing archives of vintage Ivy menswear publications, catalogs, etc. anywhere. Hands down.  It’s a daily read for inspiration, education & nostalgia.  Last week HTJ ran an amazing vintage spread on Ivy Today – 1975 via “Men’s Club” magazine. The pics are truly priceless– including a great ad for the then relatively young brand, Polo Ralph Lauren (est. 1967).

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men's club magazine 6-1975

Vintage 1975 Polo Ralph Lauren ad

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A young Ralph Lauren, via Men's Club 1975

A young Ralph Lauren, via Men's Club 1975

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Double Take | Menjou & Morrissey

 

Adolphe Menjou, film star and style icon-- ca. 1927Morrissey, moody British crooner and the man that launched a million emo bands

 

Adolphe Menjoumorrissey

Adolphe Menjou below, elegantly reigned as one of the best-dressed stars of the silver screen during the 1920s, ’30s & ’40s.  The mustachioed sartorialist immediately brings to mind the dapper & distinguished gents of the Esky/Apparel Arts era of menswear illustration.  He always dressed impeccably and carried himself in a way that few could.  Look carefully at the picture below with the parrot on his shoulder– Glen plaid dress shirt & tie under a crazy, chunky houndstooth sportcoat.

Menjou above left, back in 1927 sans his signature full mustache and his flawlessy slicked-back hair.  The bottom left photo looks so much like Morrissey that I had to do a double take– well, the image is actually a photoshop creation merging the two style icons. 

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Profiles in Style | Beyond the Clothes

 

Speaking with Adam Lippes recently, he shared a story about one of the nicest compliments he’s ever received.  Adam was working under Oscar De La Renta at the time, and Oscar commented in front of a group– “Everyone, look how rich Adam looks– and he’s not wearing a single rich thing.”  

Now, I think that says a lot about someone’s personal style.  They look great, but there isn’t one single item that overshadows, steals their thunder, or that takes away from the total package.  Confidence (not arrogance), a great personality (and sex appeal), and meticulous grooming, all go a long way towards defining and determining style too.  

When you have it all, it (style) becomes more of an aura than a fashion moment or a look.  Your style ceases to be something you put on, but rather who you are.   

The clothes alone don’t make the man. 

 

adam lippes

 

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