PEOPLE ALWAYS CALLED ME BLONDIE | AT SOME POINT I BECAME DIRTY HARRY

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“Hi, it’s Deb.  You know, when I woke up this morning I had a realization about myself.  I was always Blondie.  People always called me Blondie, ever since I was a little kid. What I realized is that at some point I became Dirty Harry.  I couldn’t be Blondie anymore, so I became Dirty Harry.”

–Debbie Harry

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Debbie Harry of Blondie, Coney Island, NY, 1977 — Image © Bob Gruen

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“It was in the early ’70s and I was trying to get across town at two or three o’clock in the morning.  This little car kept coming around and offering me a ride.  I kept saying ‘No’ but finally I took the ride because I couldn’t get a cab.”  

“I got in the car and the windows were are rolled up, except for a tiny crack.  This driver had an incredibly bad smell to him. I looked down and there were no door handles.  The inside of the car was stripped. The hairs on the back of my neck just stood up.”  

“I wiggled my arm out of the window and pulled the door handle from the outside.  I don’t know how I did it, but I got out. He tried to stop me by spinning the car but it sort of helped me fling myself out.”

” Afterwards I saw him on the news–  Ted Bundy.”

–Debbie Harry

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Debbie Harry, NYC, 1976 –  Image © Bob Gruen

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1978 — Debbie Harry of Blondie — Image by © Martyn Goddard/Corbis

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The Passenger

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It’s been months now since I’ve flown anywhere, and I really miss it.  Like, bad.  Getting out of town– a break in the routine– taking care of business and firming relationships– seeing new people and places– cool restaurants and hotels– gone.

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The Day-Glo House of Sprouse.

Marc Jacobs

Above– For Fall 2006, Marc Jacobs utilized Sprouse’s 1987 graffiti leopard images for handbags, shoes, and scarves for Louis Vuitton, which sold-out instantly.

The continuing celebration of Stephen Sprouse’s incredible art and fashion legacy hosted by Louis Vuitton, and launch of  the new The Stephen Sprouse Book by Rizzoli, has everyone a-glow.  

Sprouse’s career started in he late ’70s, when after working for Halston, he moved to a warehouse on the Bowery, and started making outfits for his neighbor, Debbie Harry to wear onstage.  The fashion world quickly embraced his innovative, culturally relevant sensibility and downtown edge.  But Sprouse’s inability to compromise his artistic vision for the rigid fashion business compromised his commercial success, and his career was ultimately cut short by his tragic death in 2004, at the age of 50.  

-From the synopsis of The Stephen Sprouse Book published by Rizzoli.

The Stephen Sprouse Book

Link to We Love Sprouse

Link to The Moment story