THE ONE MOTORCYCLE SHOW ROUNDUP | PORTLAND IS MY KIND OF TOWN

The One Motorcycle Show has officially blown-up. Hat tip to Thor Drake & crew at See See Motorcycles for putting on an unforgettable event, and forging a community of passionate and fun-loving riders, builders & fans that now call The 1 Moto home. It was definitely an eclectic mix of personalities and styles that made for an epic display of jaw-dropping machines. Big name custom-build powerhouses cozied-up next to local bikes and newcomers. Young and old stood shoulder to shoulder without a dissenting word towards old farts or hipsters alike. In fact, there were more smiling faces and open hearts than you could shake a chain at, as everyone pulled together without nary a grumble and gave the crowd a show they won’t soon forget– I know I won’t. The talented Scott Toepfer was official bike photographer, and Ray Gordon’s THROTTLED II exhibit raised the rafters off Sandbox Studio.

I dare say– How the HELL are you gonna top this one, Thor!?

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Blue Todd shovelhead

Todd Blubaugh proudly posing on his Harley-Davidson Shovelhead, so good to meet you. 

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scott toepfer photography the one motorcycle show chopper

Buddy and badass photographer Scott Toepfer snaps this Harley-Davidson Shovelhead chopper.

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ray gordon throttled II

Pre-show snapshot of THROTTLED II goodness by the irrepressible Ray Gordon – love that guy.

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the moto lady the one motorcycle show portland

The Moto Lady taking advantage of the pre-show calm at The One Motorcycle Show.

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triumph springer

Old school Triumph Springer at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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the one motorcycle show 21 helmets

Sick patch denim helmet by  Jud (@GH0STS) at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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Ray Gordon Throttled II photography

A gallery of badass bikes being placed in front of the THROTTLED II photography by Ray Gordon

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harley-davidson knucklehed the one motorcycle show portland

Harley-Davidson Knucklehead at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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see see motorcycles

See See Motorcycles 

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moto guzzi v7 racer motorcycle

Moto Guzzi V7 Racer at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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see see motorcycles the one motorcycle show hats

The One Motorcycle Show put on by Thor Drake & crew at See See Motorcycles in Portland, Oregon.

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see see motorcycles yamaha the one motorcycle show portland

Sweet lil’ Yamaha bike by See See Motorcycles at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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brent wick the one motorcycle show 21 helmets

Amazing helmet artwork by Brent Wick at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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hammarhead industries v7 wayward moto guzzi the one motorcycle show portland

Hammarhead Industries V7 Wayward Motto Guzzi, The One Motorcycle Show — Portland, OR.

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throttled II Ray Gordon the one motorcycle show

The crowd of motor-heads and photography fans at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, Oregon.

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LEMON DROP THE ONE MOTORCYCLE SHOW

1970 Triumph T100C 500cc “Lemon Drop” — winner of the “lots and lots of polishing” award.

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the one motorcycle show portland

Motorcycle fans from all walks of life — taking it in at The One Motorcycle Show in Portland, OR

 

icon motorsports garage motrcycle

Visit to Icon Motorsports headquarters with new buddies Loaded Gun Customs & CafeRacer.XXX

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icon motorsports toolbox

Visit to Icon Motorsports headquarters with new buddies Loaded Gun Customs & CafeRacer.XXX

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RELATED TSY POSTS:

SCOTT TOEPFER’S ORIGINAL BLACKBIRD PHOTOGRAPHY | DENIM ON 2 WHEELS

AMERICA’S BONES CALL TO THE RIDER | “GHOST TOWN, U.S.A” — A FILM BY SCOTT TOEPFER

IT’S BETTER IN THE WIND…THE FILM | TOEPFER & CREW, “SHOW, DON’T TELL.”

21 HELMETS @THE ONE MOTORCYCLE SHOW | SEE SEE MOTORCYCLES, PDX

13 thoughts on “THE ONE MOTORCYCLE SHOW ROUNDUP | PORTLAND IS MY KIND OF TOWN

  1. They look nice, yes, but have way too small front fenders or none at all so probably throwing mudd, dirt and pebbles across driver, exhaust manifolds and engine. Some have fuel tanks holding approximately two drips of fuel, really?

    Most of those beautiful motorcycles aren’t intended to be driven, it seems. What a waste!

    • Stephan:
      That particular chopper style with the tiny tank is what it is, but don’t be fooled by this small sample of pics. Honestly, I can’t imagine how anyone could select just a few pics to give even a clue to the range of stuff that was on display. There were many bikes there that perhaps weren’t as photogenic (and some that were…) that looked quite ready for anything the road (or dirt in some cases…) could throw at them – some that looked like they had traveled across the country to get there. Hell, there were more bikes parked on the street than most shows can boast!

      Not just a trailer queen show!

    • Stephan,

      I agree with you 100%. BUT what you can do when customizing a bike is build it so it is flexible and can easily be altered. Build it first so it looks beautiful to your eye. Then build a front fender that can be attached in 5 minutes that gives great protection and does not detract too much from the sleekness of the bike. Have an extra gas tank that holds more fuel. Have a quick mount windshield and strap-on luggage. For about $1,000 you would have a wonderful Blue Highways touring bike that would make every Aspencade and Ultra Glide rider feel like ultra conformist conspicous consumers.

      • I notice just as many bikes with no rear fenders in these photos.
        Bikes are used for different purposes and are built to conform to those purposes.

    • Some people are so stupid, research before comment in the future.
      Great pictures guys and girls, i hope there are a lot more to come….. soon. looks like it was a great show with some amazing bikes and accessories.

      • MACMACMAC, I was simply speaking from my limited experience in this matter, which bases on my own so called Chopper/Cruiser-Style Honda Shadow Spirit which indeed has a stock front fender which is at least five inches too short I’d say. Likely intended as a nice weather motorcycle, but I don’t care too much for weather. However, even in nice weather, result of this lame excuse of a front fender is continous sanding of the frame while driving around and of course rust starting to grow then. This fender obviously could be replaced for way too much money and painted the same colour as the bike’s other plastic parts have but come on, I’d like to drive it, not to fiddle on every bit.

        So my priorites are clear and as stated before, I appreciate the nice work and look of the bikes depictured here, but at least some of them do not seem to be usable most of the year where I live. Too precious to be exposed to the elements, it seem. It’s always a tradeoff between looks and usability and I’m more on the must-be-useful side.

  2. Hey that shovelhead “low-miler” is my bike! Thanks TSY! We met for a sec at the show before you made it into the Deus van I do believe. There truly is no “One Motorcycle” but this was my single down tube dream prostreet inspired budget custom. 30 feet feels like 300 miles. I employed the metal fab wizardry of Josh Ewing who has a magical garage in middle western Washington with very rare metal tools. He was hand fabbing car panels while I was putting together my motor the night before the show and he stayed way past his bedtime to help make the bike pop. He is world class and capable of making anything from metal. Contact him through Facebook at /ewingkustoms. Mike Nazaroff gave me a shit ton of time in his machine shop down south of Seattle in Georgetown. Hes got a scooter forte but loves anything with gears. He machined the rear aluminum wheel and was there to help me conceptualize with a super free spirit unlike every other machinist I worked with. Contact him at /michael.nazaroff.5 on Facebook. Shout outs to the dudes at Twinline and all the bros in the JetCity and Superglide Summer crews.

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